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Shale Gas, Regulation, and Economic Growth

March 1, 2013 by Nicholas Saliba

We recently wrote about how abundant shale gas has spurred a manufacturing renaissance in America. One of the companies benefitting most from low natural gas prices is Dow Chemical. In a recent Wall Street Journal opinion piece, Andrew N. Liveris, CEO of Dow Chemical, warns against rushing to export our country’s shale gas to overseas markets.

On the one hand, natural gas producers are eager to build export terminals and ship liquefied natural gas (LNG) to markets such as Asia and Europe, where the gas commands a much higher price. On the other hand, manufacturers such as Dow Chemical worry that exporting LNG will drive up the price of natural gas in the U.S., halting a manufacturing resurgence that has been spurred by cheap feedstock and low energy costs.

The question of whether or not U.S. producers should be allowed to export shale gas will be a source of much debate in the coming years. It is important that this issue be considered through the lens of economic growth. For that reason, in September 2013, the Bush Institute will host a major energy conference that focuses on the many ways in which regulation of the industry affects economic growth. Leading up to the conference, we will be publishing papers and covering the growth potential of the energy industry on the “Energy” page of our website. We hope readers will check back often for updates.

 


Author

Nicholas Saliba
Nicholas Saliba

Nicholas Saliba is a consultant for the George W. Bush Institute and a Fellow with the Maguire Energy Institute in the Cox School of Business at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. He graduated Magna Cum Laude with Honors from Southern Methodist University in May 2014, receiving a B.B.A. in Finance, B.S. in Economics with Financial Applications, and B.A. in Public Policy. He also received minors in History and Political Science, along with a concentration in Energy Management.

Mr. Saliba has been a writer and researcher for the 4% Growth Project, the North America Scorecard Project, and the North America Working Groups of the George W. Bush Institute. He has co-authored numerous studies, and spoken on issues pertaining to finance, economics, and public policy in the energy sector. In 2013, Mr. Saliba was the co-author of the book "The Energy Logjam: Removing Regulatory Obstacles to Fuel the Economy," published by the George W. Bush Institute. Additionally, he has consulted on issues pertaining to energy, economics, and public policy for organizations including Consumer Energy Alliance, Texas Education Service Centers, D Magazine, Bracewell & Giuliani LLP, the Ohio Oil & Gas Association, and Energy Future Holdings.

Mr. Saliba is a member of Delta Sigma Pi Professional Business Fraternity, Omicron Delta Epsilon International Honor Society in Economics, and Phi Beta Kappa.

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