How Your District Compares

American children deserve a quality education to ensure that they can learn the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in today’s world. Search for a school district to see how the educational performance of U.S. students compares to state, national and international peers.

Math and reading achievement are percentile rankings. The rankings describe where the average student in a district is achieving relative to the performance of students in the state, country, and average developed economy. For example, a percentile of 50 means the average student in a school district would perform better than 50% of the students in the comparison group.

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The average student in {[input.activeEntity.name]} is performing better than {[data[0].grc_percentile | percent:0]} of students in {[input.activeEntity.state]}, {[data[1].grc_percentile | percent:0]} of students in the nation, and {[data[2].grc_percentile | percent:0]} of students in other developed economies. Global Report Card data is unavailable for these selections. Try selecting a different city, subject or year. See the full city report for {[input.activeEntity.name]}.

{[input.activeEntity.name]}

{[input.compareEntity.name]}

{[tooltip.data.comparison]}: {[tooltip.data.grc_percentile | percent:0]}
{[tooltip.data.comparison]}: {[tooltip.data.grc_percentile | percent:0]}

What is this data?

Students in every district in the country take state accountability tests in math and reading. The Global Report Card data provides information on the average level of student achievement in math and reading in virtually all U.S. school districts relative to the student achievement in a set of international peers.

While only two factors among many, student achievement in math and reading can predict the future success of those students.

What do the measures of achievement mean?

Math and reading achievement are percentile rankings. The rankings describe where the average student in a district is achieving relative to where students in the average developed economy would be performing.

For example, a score of 60 means that the average student in a district does better than 60% of the students in the average developed economy.

How does it work to compare student achievement in the U.S. to other countries?

State accountability test results in every grade are used to generate an average level of achievement in each district. That achievement level is adjusted once based on the extent to which the average achievement in that state, as measured by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), is higher or lower than the national average. The district level is adjusted a second time based on the extent to which the U.S. does better or worse than students in a set of countries with developed economies, as measured by the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA).

2011-12 and 2013-14 data each use four years of student assessment data to calculate percentiles (2008-09 to 2011-12 and 2010-11 to 2013-14). Click here to download the full 2011-12 methodology. 2013-14 data uses the same methodology but with updated years. To view previous years’ Global Report Card data, see globalreportcard.org.