Sarah E. Moten
International Affairs Specialist

We are saddened to report that Dr. Sarah Moten, a member of our council, passed away on July 9, 2013. During the years of the Bush Administration, Dr. Moten was a valuable partner at USAID, helping girls across Africa receive an education. She continued to be a valued member of our council providing guidance and support for the African First Ladies Summit up to the last weeks of her life. She had a long and distinguished career, and was a wonderful friend to so many.

Dr. Sarah E. Moten served as chief of the Education Division of the USAID Africa Bureau’s Office of Sustainable Development. She retired from USAID in  2010.

As division chief, Moten managed a team of education professionals who provided guidance to 21 African bilateral education programs. She also managed the Africa Education Initiative, which provided $600 million to support teacher training, textbook  development, and girls’ scholarships, among other initiatives. In addition, she managed a $30 million school fees program that worked to keep children in school.

Moten also served as deputy coordinator of basic education for the U.S. State Department.

She was director of international affairs at the University of the District of Columbia; an international affairs consultant; special assistant to the president emerita for the National Council of Negro Women; deputy assistant secretary for international refugee assistance at the State Department; and a Peace Corps country director in Swaziland, Kenya, and Sierra Leone.

She earned a doctorate from Clark Atlanta University, and honorary doctorates from Elizabeth City State University, Chicago State University, and the University of Massachusetts Boston. In 2008, the Foundation for Democracy in Africa awarded her its Medal of Freedom, and Swarthmore honored her with its Worldwide Award for Women in Education and Government.

Other honors Moten has received include the Outstanding Partners in Education Award from World Education; the Distinguished Leadership Award from Boston University’s African Presidential Archives & Research Center; and the John L. Withers Memorial Award from USAID.