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Two-Minute Take: The All-Volunteer Family

March 6, 2019 3 minute Read by Colonel Matthew F. Amidon, USMCR
While there has been great attention to hiring veterans, spouses are often overlooked. Military Service Initiative Director Col. Matthew Amidon shares how this impacts the all-volunteer family and what businesses can do to help.

Why is it important we support military spouses just as much as we support our veterans? 

Military families are crucial to the stability and health of our all-volunteer force and nation. They bear the burden, anxiety, and stress of their loved one’s deployment, and they are the ones who endure multiple moves. It's time that we start prioritizing military spouses and families care and benefits. 

While there has been great attention to hiring our veterans, the spouses are often overlooked. In a recent survey, 30 percent of our military spouses were unemployed, a far greater percentage than Americans outside the military. And 56 percent of employed spouses indicated they are underemployed. Difficulty in finding the right job or career is crucial as 70 percent of millennial military families surveyed cited having two incomes as crucial to their families well-being. 

Military spouses face great challenges when trying to balance their home life and find career paths suitable to their amazing skill-sets. Some key findings from a 2017 U.S Chamber Hiring our Heroes study on military spouses in the workplace found that: 

  • Many spouses are in part time or seasonal positions when they would prefer full time or permanent work. 
  • Military spouses with degrees face the highest rates of unemployment and the most difficulty finding meaningful work. 
  • Moves between duty stations play havoc on careers. Not only do most military spouses have to quit jobs because of a move, they face long periods of unemployment after the move. 
  • Like most American families, military families want and need two incomes – something that is much harder for them to achieve. 
  • The lack of employment opportunities creates stress and influences a family's decision to stay In or leave the military – factors that ultimately hurt military readiness, retention, and recruiting. 

What can the business community be doing to help military spouses?

So much great work has been done on behalf of our Warriors but we must never forget that for many, it is the family that serves and transitions. Providing meaningful career pathways for our Warrior spouses is not only the right thing to do, it is the smart thing to do.

Businesses and communities can help out in many ways starting with: 


Author

Colonel Matthew F. Amidon, USMCR
Colonel Matthew F. Amidon, USMCR

Colonel Matthew F. Amidon, USMCR, is the Director of the Military Service Initiative at the George W. Bush Institute. Colonel Amidon leads the day to day efforts of the Military Service Initiative and the team leading our policy and programmatic work on veteran transition.

Colonel Amidon has served in both active duty and reserve capacities since 1994. As an AV-8B Harrier pilot, he deployed in support of both Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, at the operational and staff level. In his current reserve capacity he serves as the Deputy Group Commander, Marine Aircraft Group 41, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing, Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth, TX.

Recently, Colonel Amidon was appointed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to the Creating Options for Veterans' Expedited Recovery (COVER) Commission. COVER provides advice to the VA, the President, and Congress, and examines the benefits of integrative treatments for the mental health conditions of veterans. The commission will also analyze the benefits of incorporating complementary and integrative health treatments in non-government affiliated facilities.

Colonel Amidon is originally from Stowe, Vermont and is a graduate of The University of Vermont. He earned his MBA at Southern Methodist University Cox School of Business in 2009. In 2012, he attended The Eisenhower School for National Security and Resource Strategy where he earned a Master of Science. Colonel Amidon is married with three children.

Full Bio

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