×

Fill out the brief form below for access to the free report.

  • George W. Bush Institute

    Content & Resources

  • Through our three Impact Centers -- Domestic Excellence, Global Leadership, and our Engagement Agenda -- we focus on developing leaders, advancing policy, and taking action to solve today’s most pressing challenges.

I'm interested in dates between:
--

Taking Action

Advancing Policy

Developing Leaders

Issues

I have minutes to read today:

Programs & Issues

Taking Action

Advancing Policy

Developing Leaders

Issues

Publication Type
Date Range
I'm interested in dates between:
--
Reading Time

I have minutes to read today:

Forget the Edu-Wonks. NAEP Scores Should Get the Attention of Workforce Development Leaders

April 13, 2018 by Anne Wicks
There is no shortage of buzz in the education policy world about the scores from the 2017 NAEP exam. But the people who really ought to be thinking about the results from the so-called “Nation’s Report Card” are the ones in charge of developing the workforce in a state or community.

Everyone in the education world is parsing out the reading and math scores in the latest edition of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). There is no shortage of buzz in the education policy world about the scores from the 2017 NAEP exam, which continue a national trend of stagnation over the last decade. Solid history and analysis can be found here and here, and a thought-provoking piece on public perception is here.

But the people who really ought to be thinking about the results from the so-called “Nation’s Report Card” are the ones in charge of developing the workforce in a state or community. If you are involved with that task in places where scores went down (like Maryland, Montana, Vermont, and Alaska to start), you must wonder about the repercussions. Who is going to supply the innovation, skill, and know-how for your state’s businesses if kids are falling behind? What does this mean for your region’s economic vitality in 10 and 20 years?

Data like NAEP scores can appear arcane and hard to apply practically. But we know that students don’t suddenly become dropouts in high school; going off-track happens far earlier in their school years. So, if it is your job to think about tomorrow’s workers, paying attention the progress – or lack thereof – of your state’s fourth and eighth grade students in reading and math is a must.

This kind of data can help those in governors’ offices, workforce commissions, and Chambers of Commerce shape their policies, strategies, and partnerships. If we see drops in fourth grade and then eighth grade, as we do in many places, those kids are very unlikely to be prepared for a good job, service in the military, an industry certificate, or a two-year or four-year degree.

To conclude with some good news, Mississippi particularly stood out. They had the largest gains for white fourth- and eighth-graders in reading. They had gains in reading and math for black fourth-graders. Something interesting is happening there that is worth understanding and sharing.  If you are involved with workforce issues in Mississippi, it is important to ask how can your state can sustain that important fourth-grade momentum through eighth-grade and beyond.

The people in the education policy world will always find things to talk about with NAEP data. Andy Rotherham succinctly captured the education policy echo chamber quite nicely. The people who can make a real difference by using NAEP data are those who must identify and develop workers for their state’s future. The business community was a meaningful partner in the education reform movement in the 2000s when accountability policies were strong and NAEP scores were ascending, particularly for our most vulnerable children. Their role still matters – and workforce development is often where the results of education policy often become tangible. 

 


Author

Anne Wicks
Anne Wicks

Anne Wicks serves as the Director of Education Reform at the Bush Institute.  In this role, she develops and oversees the policy, research, and engagement work of the Education Reform team. 

Before joining the Bush Institute, Wicks served for five years as Associate Dean for External Relations at the University of Southern California's Rossier School of Education.  In addition to leading a team with revenue, communications, and engagement goals, she supported Dean Karen Symms Gallagher on a variety of special projects including the launch and early growth of Ednovate Charter Schools.  She currently serves as the chair of PMC Support, a supporting organization for Ednovate Schools.  Over her career, she has held management and resource development roles at organizations including Teach for America, the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, and Stanford University. Anne holds a B.A in American Studies and a M.A. in Education from Stanford University (during which she taught 8th grade social studies), as well as a M.B.A. from the University of Southern California. A former captain of Stanford's women's volleyball team, Anne was part of three national championship teams, two as a player and one as an assistant coach. 

Full Bio