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November 21, 2014 by Brittney Bain

A United Nations General Assembly committee voted this week to recommend that the UN Security Council refer to the International Criminal Court evidence of North Korea’s crimes against humanity. The evidence includes alarming human rights abuses in the country’s political prison camps. The Washington Post featured a compelling editorial on the matter, urging the Security Council to take action. As the editors point out, “When the gates to the concentration camps are opened in North Korea, who will be able to say: We knew, and we did something about it? Now it is up to the U.N. Security Council.”

There’s been interesting discussion once again on the Keystone pipeline this week. This editorial in the USA Today urges Washington to move forward on the Keystone XL project, calling it long overdue. While a vote in the Senate failed on Tuesday, the piece says : “Keystone is a useful way to provide oil for a nation that, like it or not, still relies heavily on petroleum and imports it from nations far less trustworthy than Canada. Most of the refined product would remain in the USA. The line would also help move landlocked oil from fields in North Dakota and Montana that must often travel by rail, a more dangerous and inefficient mode of transport ... It's long past time to say yes.”

And speaking of Washington, there’s plenty of commentary on the latest immigration executive action, but we’re reading research from Pew that breaks down the numbers on issue. It’s an important reminder that we should be focused on immigration reform and keep in mind what immigrants contribute.


Author

Brittney Bain
Brittney Bain

Brittney Bain serves as the Director of Communications for the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

Prior to joining the Bush Center, she worked on Capitol Hill where she served most recently as deputy press secretary for the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary.  Bain interned in the White House Office of Communications during the George W. Bush Administration.

She received her bachelor’s degree from Baylor University and her master’s degree from The Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University.

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