×

Fill out the brief form below for access to the free report.

  • George W. Bush Institute

    Our Ideas

  • Through our three Impact Centers — Domestic Excellence, Global Leadership, and our Engagement Agenda — we focus on developing leaders, advancing policy, and taking action to solve today’s most pressing challenges.

I'm interested in dates between:
--

Taking Action

Advancing Policy

Developing Leaders

Issues

I have minutes to read today:

Programs & Issues

Taking Action

Advancing Policy

Developing Leaders

Issues

Publication Type
Date
I'm interested in dates between:
--
Reading Time

I have minutes to read today:

ICYMI: A Dialogue Between Amity Shlaes and Paul Volcker

February 1, 2013 by Jacqueline Lowe

In A Dialogue Between Amity Shlaes and Paul Volcker, former chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank, featured under Editorial Reviews on Amazon here, Shlaes and Volcker discuss Shlaes’ latest book, Coolidge, a biography of the 30th President of the United States. Even though Calvin Coolidge served as president decades ago, from 1923 to 1929, Volcker notes, “there are some parallels to current times. During his time, Coolidge was under great pressure, much like today. Even before he was president, as governor of Massachusetts, Coolidge was forced into the Boston police strike. He took a principled stance.” Shlaes, Director of The 4% Growth Project at the Bush Institute, and Volcker discuss the lessons learned from a somewhat forgotten president, especially in today’s economic climate. Volcker says, “But in fact there’s so much to learn from Coolidge. Any president is going to face a lot of problems and Coolidge faced up to them. He produced, after Harding, honest government. He contributed to some degree of trust in government. Americans today need to read Amity’s biography to learn more about him.” To read more of the conversation between Shlaes and Volcker, the lessons we can learn from Coolidge, and how the Federal Reserve and economic policy of his time of economic growth compare to ours today, click here.

Related Articles: