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Restricting Exports Kills Growth, Jobs and Government Revenue

April 17, 2012 1 minute Read by Bernard L. Weinstein

As an energy-abundant nation, America logically should be a major energy exporter. This already is the case with coal, and there is no reason we can’t become one of the world’s largest gas exporters as well, with all the attendant job creation that would entail. We also should bear in mind that Canada is pushing to become a major LNG exporter and already has issued export licenses for several projects on its Pacific coast. Let’s not repeat the mistake of the Keystone XL pipeline by imposing roadblocks to exporting America’s natural gas. The full article can be found herein The Washington Times. This post was written by Bernard L. Weinstein, associate director of the Maguire Energy Institute in the Cox School of Business at Southern Methodist University and fellow with the George W. Bush Institute.


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Bernard L. Weinstein
Bernard L. Weinstein

Bernard L. Weinstein is Associate Director of the Maguire Energy Institute and an Adjunct Professor of Business Economics in the Cox School of Business at Southern Methodist University. He has taught at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the State University of New York, the University of Texas at Dallas, and the University of North Texas. He has authored or co-authored numerous books, monographs, and articles on the subjects of economic development, energy security, public policy, and taxation. His work has appeared in professional journals as well as the popular press. He earned an A.B. degree from Dartmouth College and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University.

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