FIVE QUESTIONS WITH Roger Roscoe

What is your fondest memory from your time working with President Bush?

President Bush always took time to meet with individuals before an event, along the rope lines or at the airport. Being able to see and hear firsthand the impact that President Bush left on these individuals was priceless. They will have that memory to share and treasure always, just as I have.

What value do you find in staying connected with your fellow Bush-Cheney alums in the area?

It is a great value. My grandparents always said “you cannot have enough friends.” That is the case with the alumni. Making new friends, meeting their families, and sharing some wonderful stories of our time that we served. I have encouraged the Tampa Bay Alumni to stay in touch with everyone and to reach out to the group if they ever need any help.

What has been the highlight for you in heading up the Tampa Bay Bush-Cheney Alumni group?

The Tampa Bay chapter has motivated and helped launch new chapters across Florida and around the United Sates. I was pleased to have Kevin Sullivan, who is a Tampa chapter member discuss what our group has been doing and encourage alumni at the recent reunion in Dallas how easy it is to get started.

Right after the Dallas reunion, I was contacted by Kevin Doyle, who is interested in starting chapters in Jacksonville and Orlando. After several conversations with Kevin, he made a trip over to Tampa and attended our chapter luncheon to see what we were all about. The Tampa Bay Alumni enjoyed meeting Kevin and look forward to supporting his chapters in the future.

What do you miss most about serving in the Administration?

I miss all of the diverse people from around the country and working with them. I was very fortunate to have experienced people around me that were always willing to share their knowledge and expertise. I am proud to say that I helped play a small role and I am part of a very special group of advance representatives.

You’ve had the unique experience of serving as a volunteer advance representative across three decades, serving both President George W. Bush and for his father’s administration. What’s been the most striking difference you’ve seen in the role?

It was a huge honor to be able to volunteer for two presidents. The biggest difference was technology with President Bush 41. Having to use “bag and brick” cell phones that weighed a lot with a small battery life was very challenging at times, as was calling a pager number to reach certain staff and hoping they received my message.

The biggest issue I had was doing site diagrams with a ruler and a sheet of paper. I went through lots of paper and erasers having my work updated. Thank goodness there was always an advance person who had had some serious design skills to help me meet my deadlines. At the end of the day, no matter what administration I volunteered in, an advance representative gets the job done no matter what.